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secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and the climate in 1963. because i don't think people understand th
in the mississippi delta it had finally gelled. it was going to happen, came to the brilliant organizer of the march. now, i found plenty of women on this amateur staff because byron was only one who really knew what he was doing. what they are really talking about is the stake of the civil rights movement circa 1963. it was frankly more advanced than america in general. but not significantly more. there was some consciousness among the younger women that women had not gotten the opportunities and the movement they were entitled to, that is -- we saw that absolutely. >> that was stokely carmichael's organization. >> john lewis'. >> it was carmichael -- one of the -- >> the women in the movement is -- >> that's after john and that's after the black power movement came in. one thing we also avoid is the kind of vision of history that frankly i'd like to do which is to say we stormed said why don't you make sure there's some women speakers. i think the reason that we were you ad by the march and the feminism in us did not come out yet is because we were just a few years ahead of feminist consciousness
finishing up my new book and this particular chapter is about sex. apparently mississippi is the dumbest state. that would concur in the sex chapter because they have the most std's in america. >> mississippi is burning. >> wow. >> bill, ninety 8% of the people sur -- 98% of the people surveyed say the worst state is whatever one you happen to be in at the time. thought? >> i don't like the theme of the show. this study proved the united states of america is like one big new york apartment. we don't know anything about our neighbors and everything we know is completely wrong. i brought this back to new york because we are rude and era gapt. arrogant. >> new york won best sports fans. you can make a case or not. but it also won worst sports fans. the last time i checked boston is not in new york. >> you just proved your point. >> coming up, what is it like to be owned more than anybody else on twitter. first, what is up with the obama's new dog? something impeachable i'm sure. any last requests mr. baldwin? do you mind grabbing my phone and opening the capital one purchase eraser? i need
said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and she ros fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discard bid a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children of color in this cou
jackson mississippi, good morning. yes, i am a conservative republican from mississippi. i agree with the doctor earlier. i think obamacare is very bad. it is going to go down naturally. i am not for a government shutdown i am for tying it to and doing asing the conservative republicans will done. i think we ought to way entitlements and electric public and in 2014. i am not for a government shutdown and i am not for obamacare. i am tying it to the debt ceiling. host: that is the strategy as far as speaker boehner is concerned. caller: i think that is what we should do. eastern and central time zones and mountain pacific time zones are the options. the numbers are on your screen, you can call the one that best represents you. for and worth -- foreign affairs released a story in the washington post this morning, talking about a reunion of families on both sides in korea -- calls, this is john from idaho, good morning. i believe that republicans are missing an opportunity right now to win if wehe government and make president obama passed the health care and not give people voucher
was not mentioned. even though in mississippi where i was working, only 3% of the black people were registered. 40% of the population and incidentally, because of our work and working with other people, mississippi had the largest number of elected officials, but now, we're here 50 years later and we find in washington that more than in 1953. more people out of work, but more importantly, we went free in 1963. we need state hood. state hood. >> better jobs, better pay was an objective in 1963. a long time before voting rights legislation would come about, but many are crediting the march to having to expedite that, so what are you hoping comes after this 50-year mark of this march? the march did sort of spur us on and lighten our spirit, but we went to work the next week in mississippi and alabama and georgia, et cetera, so what i hope this march will do is let us know the struggle is not over. there's still massive discrimination, unemployment, gaps between the white and black students and it would spur us on to stop being so complacent, but from my point in washington, state hood is my number on
's not a pretty picture. here's just one example. three men on a summer's day in mississippi. why are they smiling and what are they really up to? yes, that's former president bill clinton on the right and on the left, his best friend forever, terry mcauliffe, former chairman of the democratic national committee, fundraiser supreme for both bill and hillary, and the personification of the corporate wing of the democratic party. smack in the middle, that's haley barbour, former chairman of the republican national committee. he made a fortune lobbying for corporations, especially for the ta backco industry, then went home to serve two terms as governor of mississippi, and couldn't wait to get back to washington, where once again, he's gun-slinging for the big boys. so why did these three d.c. desperadoes ride into a small mississippi town? seems that when barbour was governor, he offered mcauliffe a very attractive state package of price and tax subsidies for a plant there to build electric cars for his greentech automotive company. mcauliffe also tapped his politically connected network for more th
in mississippi. and i think part of it was that these young idealistic college students wanted to understand these people, not as abstractions, not as enemies, not as human beings and that's exactly why -- what agee accomplishes but the other thing they were drawn to was that it showed them how to live without armor. it showed them how to live according to the principles without compromise. i teach "let us now praise famous men," or try to do my freshman and they hate it. i don't care. [laughter] because there are a couple of every semester t who did it and it's worth it but it's worth it. and "let us now praise famous men," as many of yo you know, is a book that you can't get past the first few pages or it changes your life. and i think in the early '60s there were people who wanted to change, who were eager for the change. and "let us now praise famous men" really spoke to that. >> is it true, agee's reputation as you say, the book itself is a commercial and more or less political flaw but he did live in new york and he had friends, and some of them talked to them. irving howe, paul goodma
. >> in the park in san francisco then to go back to mississippi or texas or whether we have escaped from. this is the only place on earth that we have so we have a special bloogs to maintain a sanctuary for lgbt people. i think this is the moment where the city is recognizing there's a problem and not all gay people are rich and thank you for your support >> thank you. >> good afternoon, commissioners. i'm at lyric. i feel it's important for the commissioners to approve this as a former queer trans youth it's difficult four us i mean the queer and queer variant. when i was in the homeless shelter it was difficult i faced many prejudices. even when shelter say they address accident queer or the transgenders i know they don't. i notice a lot of any sisters from the age of 16 to 24 their subject to a lot of abuse and be it physical or verbal they suffer abuse in general. it's hard to exist in a closed-minded society. you're not seen as the person you are but whatever someone else knows you represent. so many of my sisters are forced out into the street to do prostitution or anyway to make
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
person and -- i'm from mississippi. and my parents have worked aggressively in the civil rights movement. my father, reverend james, actually integrated schools in in mississippi. we had the chain gangs before my father got involved in criminal is.tice system. it takes a village to raise a child. i'm using a hillary clinton quote. even though we have come a long way from 50 years ago, we have a long way to go. as for role models, parents should be role models. teachers should be role models and schools should be role models for children. not just one person. >> thank you, both for your thoughts on this historic day as we take a look back and forward. now let's switch gears and let's talk as we mentioned in the intro about -- the affordable care act and the problems that seem to continue to plague obama care. so, debbie, what are your thoughts on the latest announcements made by the university of virginia and made by ups and they won't cover spouses and you can get coverage other places and then -- also, delta comment being the cost that they will approve as a result. >> i think people ar
oxford, mississippi, they had the violence down there to keep black students out. george wallace stood in the schoolhouse door. king was a march for jobs and freedom but that didn't produce the civil rights accident. what produced it, john, was the death of john f. kennedy a couple months later when he was assassinated and linden johnson's presidency and building on that movement to pass the civil rights act, and then selma produced the voting rights act. but let me say this john. there was a downside in that decade, too. snick was no longer led by john lewis but h rap brown and stokley carmichael. you had the riots in watts in '65. dr. king was shot, a hundred cities burned, including washington, d.c. i was in nixon's campaign. the whole issue was law and order in america, and at one point nixon and wallace together had almost 70% of the national vote. >> eleanor. >> well, that was quite a trip through history, thank you. but nixon and wallace together culminate in the southern strategy where you take political exploitation of the plight, if you will, of blacks in the south, and when
of the -- and i came up from mississippi where i had been working with the student nonviolent coordination committee in the mississippi delta, and i was standing right up there near the lincoln statue where the people are gathered all on the steps then. i guess post 9/11, you can't have them so close, and i remember that the best view was not when i would come down and look up. the best view was when i would look out and see that the march, which had a lot of doubt hanging over it, would people really come, because there had never been a mass march on washington before for any cause. would they come? how would they be received and here, i could not see the end of the people. march by any measure had been a success, more people for any cause had gathered on this space 50 years ago. >> we thank you for taking the time now to help us remember that day 50 years ago and educate many of us who don't remember it, but know of its power in the history books. thanks so much. our live coverage of the march in washington continues next hour. former d.c. mayor, marian berry, will be joining us live. he
in mississippi, i was 14 years old. and it was scary as hell. my father was arrested over 50 times and i got arrested with him once, myself. my mother would never bail him out. after the third time the sheriffs called, this time they called and said well, your son is with them. they bailed us both out. and i said next year, pop, how about we go to the beach? >> all right, so this is for me, from deborah k., i just wanted to know where did she go to college and what prompted her to be a conservative? >> i went to the university of arizona, bear down, go wildcats, my parents were conservatives, i'm a daughter of the american revolution. i wrote a letter to bill clinton when i was 6 years old, about how our taxes are too high. all right, this is for all of us. this is from tim c. you have just been nominated as ambassador of the united states, congratulations, which country, and why? >> england, because it is the only place i could speak the language. >> brazil, i love their energy policy. >> i love their women. >> of course. >> awesome. >> if i chose a country i wanted to be from, other than t
. >> when the mississippi in southwest georgia and alabama, in harlem, chicago, philadelphia, and all over this nation the blacks are on the march for freedom. >> plus the force of labor vital to the civil rights movement, vital to the success of the march on washington. and as we go to break, the beat of music at the heart of the day. gospel singer mahalia jackson and her rendition of "how i got over" went down in history. ♪ how did we make it over ♪ look back in wonder how we made it over ♪ ♪ tell me how we got over the boys used double miles from their capital one venture card to fly home for the big family reunion. you must be garth's father? hello. mother. mother! traveling is easy with the venture card because you can fly any airline anytime. two words. double miles! this guy can act. wanna play dodge rock? oh, you guys! and with double miles you can actually use, you never miss the fun. beard growing contest and go! ♪ i win! what's in your wallet? his day of coaching begins with knee pain, when... [ man ] hey, brad, want to trade the all-day relief of two aleve for six tyl
is oliver waylon leathers born may 19th in mississippi weighing 7 pounds and 10 ounces. his parents nathan and mary beth are enjoying every minute because he's growing so fast. >> he looks like he says, what happened? >> big congratulations. if you want a chance for your baby to appear in our today's johnson's baby of the week go to klgandhoda for details. >>> it's try day friday. we have our white gloves on. there's some beautiful dancers over here. jubilee dancers. >> should we go join them? >> yes. they are from bally's in las vegas. one of them is catherine. the other is kathy. and the other is kelly ripa. nice to meet you guys. a lot of kathys here today. first of all, you are here in new york doing auditions for other kathys to go to vegas and be a jubilee dancer, right? >> yes. >> what's so difficult to do? >> it's pretty hard. there's lots of kicks. lots of bevels. >> why don't you show us a couple of moves. >> the hardest part is getting the body to look like yours. >> it's not going to fit hoda's head. >> i believe. >> ow, that's got to hurt her. >> it's fine. it's good. no, it's
to be a person that is helping the cause and not coming against it. >> you grew up in mississippi? >> i did. kelly, i am two generations short from maids and farmers. it's because of my father, the late reverend james thomas mcclowen, that my mother got to go to high school. he built the first black high school in mississippi, my town. we have a long way to go. my father worked heavily to help integrate schools in mississippi. but today we don't have a level playing field when it comes to education. today the new plantation is the prison system. we have more black males in the prison system. so with the hard work that my father did and by the way, he was assistant warden also in the prison where before my father got there, there were chain gangs. my father really believed that you could rehabilitate the criminal. so we have a long way to go with the inner city, with people now on welfare, more so than ever before. so we have equal opportunity. do we have equal access? >> jack gains, thank you. joe freeman, good friends of mine. thank you both. juan williams, always good to have you. angela,
. and go back to mississippi, go back to north carolina. come here, but don't stay here. if you're going to change the nation, you've got to think states? and this is a question of what is happening in our local community. we will continue with coverage of this 50th commemoration of the march on washington when we return. [ bottle ] okay, listen up! i'm here to get the lady of the house back on her feet. [ all gasp ] oj, veggies -- you're cool. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! 'cause i'm re-workin' the menu, keeping her healthy and you on your toes. [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. i see you, cupcake! uh-oh! [ bottle ] the number one doctor recommended brand. ensure®. nutrition in charge™. [ bottle ] the number one doctor recommended brand. help keep teeth clean and breath play close.fresh and close. with beneful healthy smile food. with special crunchy kibbles and great taste... ...it's a happy way to a healthy smile. new beneful healthy smile food and snacks >>> i
in 1955 in a town called bell zony, mississippi, william moore, a postman from maryland that walked a letter, was walking with a letter to the governor that was murdered, viola, a mother of five, people, regular people, not just the iconic leading we remember but regular people tired of the foot of oppression on their back and stood up and said no, they made the difference. they made this 50th anniversary of the march on washington possible, and i think it is important to remember the sacrifices they made. the southern poverty law center, in fact, was founded to ensure that the promises of that movement would be a reality, become a reality for every person, and so we want to be inspired today by those who came before us. and as congressman lewis said and the clip that you played a little bit ago, that we have got to continue to stand up. we have to continue to demand justice. fredrick douglas says power concedes nothing without a struggle, and certainly the civil rights movement is an example of a struggle by the people. >> civil rights legend andrew young, thank you to you, ben jea
at birmingham and mobs in mississippi. they sat down at lunch counters so others could stand up. they marched and they organized. remember dr. king did march from selma to montgomery -- he didn't speak by himself, he didn't -- there were thousands marching with him and before him and thousands more that did the dirty work that precede it had march. the successful strategies were litigation, organization, mobilization, and coalition. all aimed at creating a national constituency for civil rights. sometimes it is the simplest of these. >> another civil rights icon, president, founder of rain bo push coalition, the reverend esse l. jackson, sr. >> today we appeal to have mercy upon our plee. i was blessed to be here 50 years ago. thank god for the journey, 50 years of tragedy and try umple. there was blood in the amplete we marched in 63. i was with him and a band of warriors as he felt the agony of the might mare approaching in memphis. the pendulum swung between hope and hopelessness, he celebrated the joy of our progress, the freedom from barberism and the right to vote. lebrate the joy of pr
was in the march. i was in the mississippi delta when i got a call from friends who say bayard said if you want to work on the march, it's going to happen. get yourself on to a plane and come to new york. and that's how i got to be on the staff of the march. one of the seminole experiences of my lich. >> 50 years ago today. we'll return to today's commemoration of the march later in the show. >>> president obama to do something about the horrifying carnage in syria. anything he can do? a live report is next. can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. yo
this huge crowd from mississippi. >> how has your time in new york been? >> wonderful. is coming here the highlight? >> absolutely. >> we are talking about his fire with areas of the west. >> overnight it went from a 60,000 acre fire to a 120,000 acre fire. 150 miles from san francisco you might think they get a big part of their water. 80% of their water comes from the hetch hetchy reservoir. there is rainfall going into the southwest. it won't come on shore with the tropical storm. southern california could be getting heavy rain falling in quick amounts of time. all of the areas that you see have flood watches and warnings going on. a couple of inches of rain have fallen and there is flooding going on. we'll send it back to you inside. >> well, remember the benghazi attacks were at a year september 11th, 2012 and we still don't have a lot of answers and folks behind bars. suspects have been identified in this attack. we are learning new information and sources told fox news that the special operations group that we put in charge of getting these guys are getting out. here is what a
assassinations the whole climate faugh -- it was not here because she was beaten in mississippi. the shares sold the black inmate , either we be hurt horribly you. so 200 demonstrations around the country. a public accommodation bill. the right to vote. chicago fair housing. the poor people's campaign to end the war in vietnam. now that made the case. we took poverty from 32 percent down to 12 from under lyndon johnson. by the way, drained his pain that johnson had more background and civil rights. only to become the most prolific solarized legislator in the history of our country. only lincoln compares with lyndon johnson. lyndon johnson was 64. the voting rights act of 65, day care, child care, workers' feeding program, appellation, original counsel, all of that is lbj. too seldom mentioned that major conventions of democrats today. no democratic record matches that of lyndon baines johnson. now, i would make this appeal, and i do close, one is that the speech was always around this day. the high moment of the dream and the low moment of memphis. and in the last staff meeting it went something
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)